Coordinating Conjunctions - Simple Examples

Coordinating Conjunctions - Simple Examples

We use coordinating conjunctions to connect elements of a sentence that are grammatically equivalent. Coordinating conjunctions include for, and, nor, but, or, yet, and so (sometimes remembered by the acronym FANBOYS).

A coordinating conjunction is necessary when listing two or more items.

When we use coordinating conjunctions to connect words and phrases, like in the example above, no comma is necessary. However, when the coordinating conjunction is connecting two independent clauses, we place a comma after the first independent clause (before the coordinating conjunction).

Some writers consider this comma unnecessary. It’s best to use the comma for formal writing, but in other cases, it’s simply a matter of style.

Similarly, some writers begin sentences with coordinating conjunctions, often for rhetorical effect.

While it’s best to avoid this practice in formal writing, using it in other types of writing is another question of style.

To learn more about coordinating conjunctions, review WriteLab’s Guide.


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