Identifying Mixed Constructions in Your Writing

Identifying Mixed Constructions in Your Writing

A mixed construction is a sentence that doesn’t fit together correctly. The writer begins with one structure and ends with another, possibly forgetting how the sentence started.

The result is an illogical sentence that confuses the reader.

The above example starts out with the subject “early detection” and then takes an unexpected turn, saying it’s “often treatable.” This is an illogical and confusing sentence because detection isn’t something that we treat.

In this example, the conclusion of the sentence doesn’t match with the introductory clause, resulting in a mixed construction.

Sometimes when you write, your ideas and thoughts move faster than your pen, pencil, or fingers on the keyboard. This can cause mixed constructions that make your ideas sound disconnected. For this reason, it’s important to read over and polish your rough draft, ensuring that your meaning will be clear to the reader.

To learn more about mixed constructions, review WriteLab’s Guide.  


WriteLab brings together Natural Language Processing, Artificial Intelligence, and English Language Instruction. Student writing is analyzed in seconds with the WriteLab app—giving students feedback and suggestions on how to revise and polish their draft.

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs—What's the Difference?

Transitive and Intransitive Verbs—What's the Difference?

Lay vs. Lie

Lay vs. Lie