Reflexive Pronouns Overview

Reflexive Pronouns Overview

To understand reflexive pronouns, you first need to know a little about pronouns and antecedents.

A pronoun is a word that substitutes for a noun, and the noun a pronoun substitutes for is called an antecedent.

Example:

"My brother refused to watch the movie It because he is terrified of clowns."

  • In this example, the pronoun is “he.” The antecedent is “brother,” because this is the noun that the pronoun “he” replaces.

We use reflexive pronouns when the subject of the sentence acts on itself, meaning the subject and object are the same.

The reflexive pronouns are myself, yourself, herself, himself, itself, herself, ourselves, yourselves, and themselves.

There’s one key difference between reflexive pronouns and other pronouns: Reflexive pronouns must appear in the same clause as their antecedents.

To learn more about reflexive pronouns, review WriteLab’s Guide.


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